Sparkling Rose For Brunch And More

Monday, February 29, 2016 10:06 PM


NV Touraine Brut Rosé
Domaine d’Orfeuilles
 
 

 

Punxsutawney Phil did not see his shadow back on the 2nd of February, and though we’re a long, long, long way from western Pennsylvania, we’ve had a strong indicationthis past week that winter may indeed be ending. Not to get carried away now, it IS still February, but there are signs that spring is on its way. In anticipation, while enjoying the still-winter sunshine, it’s easy to daydream about some of spring’s pastimes. Being food and wine people, we enjoy our meals in all seasons, but spring seems to be the best season for the Sunday Brunch. As fun and delicious as brunch in the springtime sun can be, one can turn it up a notch with the simple addition of one thing:bubbles. How about pink bubbles? Even better. Just in from a recent container is a new batch of our favorite value sparkling Rosé, the Domaine d’Orfeuilles Touraine Brut Rosé.
 
 
Of course, the Touraine Brut Rosé is not just for Sunday brunch, but it sure does the trick. This cuvée is equal parts Côt (Malbec) and Cabernet Franc, with 20% Loire Valley’s Grolleau. Mmmmm. Just daydreaming about some brunch favorites … Huevos Rancheros, Corned Beef Hash with poached eggs,Dungeness Crab Benedicts (fingers crossed that we’ll get some soon), or fresh scones with fresh fruit. All of these would be complemented with a glass ofd’Orfeuille’s Touraine Brut Rosé. Its color is a remarkable subtle pink with salmon hues. While sparkling in the glass, it emits aromas of red berries, pink grapefruit, and apple blossoms. The palate is dry and crisp (it is Brut after all) as the hints of the white, pink, and red fruits provide fine layers of complexity. The finish is fresh and crisp, all in balance. It’s a great food wine – and I can make a case for pouring this with a nice salmon dinner, or better yet, fried chicken. Come to think of it, either of those would be fantastic! If you want to wait for supper to pop one, that’s fine. I just think that we’re entitled to one festive Sunday Brunch each spring, and considering place of origin, flavor profile, texture, and price, the Domaine d’Orfeuilles Brut Rosé belongs on that table!
 
I am so looking forward to that festive Sunday Brunch,whenever it may happen. In the meantime, with spring on the horizon, I am currently working on my favorite puzzle: my schedule for Primeurs week in Bordeaux. I will be off in a month’s time, along with the rest of the wine world, to check in on the 2015 vintage.I’m bracing myself for a lot of hype and unfortunately, rising prices. With that inevitability, I’ve been telling anyone who will listen, Pssst. Do you want very good quality Bordeaux for your cellar that’s priced right? 2014.Seriously, 2014 was a fine vintage with very fair pricingthat was boosted by a strong dollar. We don’t know what will happen with the currency situation, but knowing what we know, the Bordelais are very happy with their 2015 vintage. That usually results in higher prices, and when that happens, watch for the 2014’s to disappear. Quickly. My schedule in Bordeaux does not allow for the festive Sunday Brunch, so I must wait until my return for that. You can bet I will have a couple of bottles of theDomaine d’Orfeuilles Touraine Brut Rosé stashed away for the occasion. – Peter Zavialoff
 

Please feel free to email me with any questions or comments about sparkling Rosé, Sunday Brunch in springtime, the 2014 Bordeaux vintage, or the upcoming annual trip: peter@wineSF.com

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Coming on the heels of our Top Ten Wines of 2015 list, I struggled while choosing a wine to write about this evening, as whatever I might choose wouldmost likely suffer by comparison. But that’s okay.Top Ten wines are special. Special wines can have elevated price tags; that’s just how markets function, efficiently. If one isto incorporate moderate wine consumption into their lifestyle, the best recommendation that I can give is tobe open and taste, taste, taste every wine that you have any interest in tasting. If you’re going to be tasting many wines over a shorter period of time, spit. Most wine tasting facilities offer spit buckets of some kind.So why exactlyshould we taste everything that we possibly can?Experience. No doubtwe will taste wines that we really like, but we’ll alsoexperience wines that don’t exactly hit home with our respective palates. Sometimes, we’ll even come across wines we do not like at all. That is all in everyone’s best interest. It’simportant to try and understand why certain wines work for us while others don’t. This will make iteasier to find wines to our liking in the future, not to mention unlocking the door to the treasure chest known as,“The best wine values!” A wine that certainly falls into that category is the2013 Domaine des Corbillières Touraine RougeLes Demoiselles.

 

 
 
Dominique and Véronique Barbou run the 26 hectare estate in the Loire Valley commune of Oisly, which is approximately 30 km east of Tours. Dominique’s great-grandfather, Fabel, purchased the property in 1923,and together with his grandson, Maurice, built the property up into its current form. TWH regulars are well aware of thetremendous value that the Barbou’s wines provide. Their Sauvignon Blanc and Rosé are house favorites for many of us. Their Touraine Rouge Les Demoiselles has beenone of my go-to reds for the better part of a decade. Usually made from Cabernet Franc, Loire Valley reds can be lighter bodied wines that exhibit distinct herbal qualites. Interestingly enough, the Barbou’s Touraine Rouge Les Demoiselles is made of 40% Pinot Noir, 30% Cabernet Franc, and 30% Côt (Malbec). For the 2013, the aromas are of lush, plump purple fruit which no doubt is the Côt’s influence. A second whiff reveals a brambly thicket undertone with hints of strawberries which we can attribute to the Pinot Noir. Thepalate entry is tangy and lively, with the woodsy Cabernet Franc coming into focus. The Côt provides a bit of weight on the palate and the Pinot Noir continues to express its aromatic complexity. The finish is crisp as the tangy mouth feel fades into the wine’s complexity. Being the sort of chap who usually reaches for white wine with his pork roasts or chops, I can easily build a case to pour this 2013 Les Demoiselles the next time I whip some up.
 
The 2013 Touraine Les Demoiselles isn’t going to make anyone forget about our Top Ten, but it has its place and will continue to provide food pairing pleasure to those who appreciate it. I still remember my very first encounter with a Loire Valley Cabernet Franc. I was perusing the selections at Mill Valley Market and decided it was time to taste a Chinon. I knew very little about Loire Valley wines at this point, as I was still regularly consuming domestic wines. Heeding my own advice mentioned above, I was on a mission to taste (and get to know) more wines out of my comfort zone. The wine was nothing like a rich, ripe, fancy oak barreled Napa Cabernet or the like. It was stemmy, woodsy, crisp and tangy. My palate was surprised to say the least. As I continued to taste more wines from different places, I weened myself from popular local wines and embraced the subtle differences of Old World wines; wines that were less fruit forward, lower in alcohol, which wereparticularly made to be enjoyed with a meal.
 
 
The best tidbit of wine advice that I ever receivedcame from an old boss of mine many years ago, JT. He lived in Napa, collected wine, and knew personally many individuals in different facets of the wine biz. Shortly after hiring me, he learned that I was very interested in wine also. He then told me, “Don’t be concerned about critics and whether or not they like the wines that you like. If you like a wine and a critic pans it, it’s good for you! There will be more of it around and the price will remain low.” Sage advice. We remain friends to this day. – Peter Zavialoff
 
Please feel free to email me with any questions or comments about Loire Valley red wine, Bordeaux, Sauternes, or English Football: peter@wineSF.com
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Domaine des Corbillières
 
I’ve been known to call Domaine des Corbillières’ Touraine blanc ‘the poor man’s Sancerre’. It’s a quick way to convey that this wine is made from Sauvignon Blanc, like Sancerre, and that it is full of attack, like good Sancerre, but because it says Touraine on the label and does not carry the same cache Sancerre does, it is less expensive. It is rightfully so that Touraine is not as prestigious as Sancerre for it is a vast region encompassing varied soils and climates, often producing underwhelming wines. However, as in every region, there are the exceptions, the stand-outs and one such winery is Domaine des Corbillières.
 
Harvest in Touraine
 
Domaine des Corbillières is situated at the eastern end of Touraine in the village of Oisly. Dominique and Veronique Barbou farm 16 hectares of Sauvignon Blanc that range in age from 13-43 years of age. The vines grow in sand atop deep clay subsoils. In 1923 Dominque’s great grandfather, Fabel, purchased the property and, legend has it, was the first in the region to recognize the benefit of growing Sauvignon Blanc in Touraine. The story goes that Fabel allowed a vine to grow alongside his home and he soon noticed how well it thrived in the terroir. True or not, that’s a pretty cool story!
 
Dominique & Veronique Barbou
 
The 2013 Touraine blanc is showing beautifully at the moment. Lots of pungent pink grapefruit and green melon flavors permeate the wine. It’s assertive without being assaulting to the nose and palate as too many Sauvignon Blancs can be in my opinion. There is enough texture to create interest in the mouth, but still manages to end with an invigorating finish. This Touraine is not only a stand-out for the region, as I wrote above, but it is a stand-out among Sauvignon Blanc.
 
The Domaine at sunset
 
My daughter wanted mac-n-cheese for dinner. Feeling motivated to cook something special, I made the mac-n-cheese from scratch. I used three different kinds of cheese, sautèed up some red and green bell peppers, and even steeped fresh herbs and garlic into the milk before making the béchamel sauce. I thought it came out pretty good. My daughter, on the other hand, was disappointed that the mac-n-cheese was a casserole! Huh? Unlike my homemade mac-n-cheese, the pasta in the boxed yellow-colored kind made stove-top does not bind together,rather it spreads all over the plate in an oozy orange-glow mess. She likes it that way better! Knowing I had a chilled bottle of the 2013 Touraine in the fridge at the ready helped me to feel more magnanimous towards her. I suggested next time I make homemade mac-n-cheese, she can make the boxed kind herself! – Anya Balistreri
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The September 2014 Dirty Dozen

Saturday, September 6, 2014 10:29 PM

On we go, into the ‘ber months! Kids are back in school, the French are back from their holidays, and here in San Francisco, it’s time for our summer! For the occasion, we’ve sourced some special wines to make our September a memorable one. Six reds, one crisp Rosé, and five whites, all chosen for their versatility, are screaming values on their own. Pack them all in a box and knock the price down 35%? Magic. The September Dirty Dozen!

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2012 Falanghina Nina, Torre Quarto $12.98 net price, $11.68 reorder

Give it a chill, just not too much, otherwise the lovely melon fruit and fragrant aromas (look for that slight hint of pine) will be muted. Falanghina, an ancient Italian grape, is grown in the south – Puglia in this instance. Yellow-gold in color, this lush white has a round texture that complements seafood, fresh salads and cold entrées.

2012 Côtes de Gascogne Cuvée Jean-Paul, Boutinot $10.98 net price, $9.88 reorder

From southwest France, this dependable refrigerator door white’s beauty – a classic blend of Colombard and Ugni Blanc – lies in its simplicity. Notes of lemon and citrus zest move into tangy grapefruit on the palate, leaving a refreshing, lingering lightness. Nothing complicated, but it’s oh so nice ice cold out of the fridge on a warm late summer’s eve.

2012 Pedro Ximenez PX, Cucao $10.98 net price, $9.88 reorder

Pedro Ximenez is a varietal known mainly for its role in Spain’s sweet sherries, but this dry example is grown in the northern-most wine region of Chile – the Elqui Valley. Sunny weather ripens the fruit while the high altitude ensures freshness. A delightful blend of acidity and concentrated fruit; try with miso-dressed soba noodles or coconut shrimp.

2013 Ventoux Rosé l’Instant, Domaine Fondrèche $15.99, $12.79 reorder

This wine gets you at ‘hello.” Just look at that color! As pale as pale Rosé gets, winemaker Sébastien Vincenti blends 50% Cinsault with 30% Syrah and 20% Grenache and the wine is light, lean, crisp, and delicious. It’s a versatile little Rosé, textbook southern French style. Got a hankering for Salmon Étoufée? If you do, try it with this.

2012 Grenache Blanc/Rolle/Roussanne, Domaine de la Petite Cassagne $12.89, $10.31 reorder

In 1998, Diane Puymorin purchased this domaine and re-named it Château d’Or et de Gueules. TWH regulars know all about her and those wines, but Diane keeps it real and pays homage to the history of her property with this bottling. Here she blends three classic white Rhône varietals. It’s crisp, clean, and fleshy. Pair it with a seared tuna sandwich.

2012 Gewurztraminer Herrenweg, Domaine Ehrhart $21.99, $17.59 reorder

Gewurztraminer is known for its profound bouquet reminiscent of lychee nuts and rose petals. The Ehrharts’ single-vineyard, Herrenweg is a tad off-dry, and is rich and expressive, both aromatically and on the palate. Not for sipping, this one needs food. Especially spicy food. You must try it with a spicy curry dish, or spicy Cajun red beans and rice.

2010 Tempranillo Dauco, Bodegas Martúe $13.98 net price, $12.58 reorder

Hailing from central Spain, this friendly Tempranillo has silky smooth tannins and rich cherry fruit. Outside Rioja, Tempranillo can show many faces, but here it shines as a versatile, charming red, reminding drinkers what makes Tempranillo just so darn delicious! Surely Paella works but so does Pollo con Arroz, Plov, or Tadig with kebabs.

2012 Malbec, Ecologica $11.98 net price, $10.78 reorder

Argentian Malbec is unquestionably a favorite for those looking for value and quality in an everyday wine. Ecologica sources only organic fruit and is Fair Trade Certified. Medium-bodied with welcoming notes of green herbs, red plum and cassis fruit, the acids and tannins hold up well to heavily-seasoned grilled meats or a quesadilla with fresh Pico de Gallo.

2010 Dão, Proeza $11.98 net price, $9.88 reorder

Looking for a full-bodied red that goes easy on the pocket book? Look no further than this voluptuous Portuguese red from Proeza. Loaded with big flavors courtesy of Touriga Nacional and Tinto Roriz, grapes traditionally made into Port, this dry red is grippy and broad-scaled. A lot of wine for the money! Hearty, rib-sticking meals would work best.

2010 Touraine Rouge, Domaine des Corbillières $14.99, $11.99 reorder

We’ve been working with Dominique and Véronique Barbou for two decades, their wines can magically transport us to the land of France’s most majestic chateaux. This blend of Pinot Noir, Côt (Malbec), and Cabernet Franc is marked by juicy fruit with an herbal twist. Drink it on its own or with anything you would want to pair with a cheerful red.

2011 Barco Reale di Carmignano, Le Farnete $14.59, $11.67 reorder

In the rolling hills just west of Firenze is the commune of Carmignano. Long before the days of the ‘Super Tuscan’, Cabernet Sauvignon was allowed to grow here, only to be blended with the native Tuscan Sangiovese. It’s a zippy little red table wine with another layer of complexity. Pasta with fresh tomatoes and basil is all you need with this one.

2009 Côtes-du-Rhône Villages, Tour de l’Isle $14.59, $11.67 reorder

Proprietor of Tour de l’Isle, Robert Rocchi acts as a negociant in the southern Rhône Valley who advises a handful of growers on improtant aspects of winemaking. The results in bottle are not only delicious, they are reflective of their places of origin. Or as Anya likes to say, “He’s not afraid to make wine that tastes good.” Try this with a grilled steak.

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Greetings! Summertime in the city of San Francisco is a little different than summertime anywhere else in the northern hemisphere. What makes it different? Well, from July 1 through August 31 a great majority of days will be foggy. It’s just a fact. It’s an annual concern on the 4th of July; will there be fireworks, or will we be socked in with fog? It happens every year, and it will last in to September. The good news is that those of us that have endured multiple foggy summers know that a drive 10 miles north, south, or east will get us out of the fog and into the sunlight, so it’s kind of the best of both worlds for us. With “nature’s air conditioner” at work, drinking red wine in August isn’t that uncommon. Anya wrote about a red wine last week, and I also did the week before.  I’m going to continue the trend here as we just got in the latest release of Domaine des Corbillières’ Touraine Les DemoisellesRouge!

 

Inspired by a regular, long-time customer yesterday, I headed over to Olivier’s Butchery here in Dogpatch and picked up some Korean short ribs to bring over to some friends’ house after work yesterday. They live about 5 miles north of the city, so they were socked in most of the day. It had just cleared when I got there, and my comment about it being summer was met with a grumble from them as they didn’t escape the grey shroud all day. I slapped the package of short ribs on the counter, and as we opened it for inspection, the first thing that I popped into my mind was “beef bacon.” The strips were cut rather thin, and according to the salesperson at Olivier’s, required one minute per side on the grill and then they would be done! Talk about delectable fast food!!! Well, what kind of wine with that? They had a bottle of Grüner Veltliner open already, so I had a glass of that while we caught up on the day’s events. Dinner was ready in a flash, beef bacon and all, and I pulled the cork on the 2011 Touraine Demoiselles from Domaine des Corbillières. How did it work out? Stellar.

2011 Domaine des Corbillieres Touraine Rouge
Red Wine; Cabernet Franc; Loire;
$15.99
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We have worked with the wines from Véronique and Dominique Barbou’sdomaine for almost 20 years! They represent tremendous value, and are popular with our staff and customers vintage after vintage. The Les Demoiselles cuvée is made of 30% Côt (Malbec), 40% Pinot Noir, and 30% Cabernet Franc. I like to say the Malbec is for backbone, the Pinot Noir for fruit, and the Cab Franc for aromatic complexity. All together, it really works, and for the 2011, it’s sensational! I really love Loire Valley Cabernet Franc. Not obscure enough to be called “wine geek wine”, its herbal profile and lack of “jammy” fruit can put off palates that aren’t used to it, as was the case with me way back when, but as times change, so do wine palates. Only representing a third of the blend, I was surprised as to how Franc-y the aromas were. Blended with the other two varietals, this wine really speaks volumes … at least it did last night! The Malbec lending its solid structure, the Pinot Noir, its fruitiness, and the Franc providing the herbal and earthy complexity. It really worked with the simple salt and pepper seasoning we laid upon the strips of rib meat. There was something spectacular about the pepper, in particular, pairing with the Cabernet Franc. All too soon the food was gone, the wine followed suit, and I was surprised again as to how the time flies.

 

Time flies alright! We’ve now been here in Dogpatch for four months! It seems only weeks ago that Liverpool could have essentially clinched their first title in the Premiership era with a victory over Chelsea back at the end of April, but captain Steven Gerrard’s blunder led to their unraveling. I’ve enjoyed friendly banter over the years with a Liverpool supporting customer who lives overseas, and before the match, via email, he wanted to make a wager on it. I politely declined his offer, but when he came into the shop the other day, he pulled two bottles of wine out of his tote and said, “I know we didn’t have a bet, but I lost, so here.” What a surprise! Thanks, Mark! Included in the duo was a half bottle of Sauternes! It’s pretty well documented that I love Sauternes. He specifically requested that I open IT on opening day. Well what do you know, with time flying and all, opening day is two weeks away! That means the annual kick-off to footy season, the Charity Shield match, is next weekend!!!! Bring it.Peter Zavialoff

Please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments on the SF fog, Loire Valley red wines, Sauternes, or English Football: peter@wineSF.com

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